soaking nuts and seeds

almonds2

Since I make my own almond milk, I buy my almonds in bulk for the better price. To make life a little easier, I soak all of them immediately and then dry them on a baking sheet on top of kitchen towel. I often use my lettuce spinner because it has a built in strainer. I LOVE my lettuce spinner.

Do you soak your nuts and seeds? Have any tips to share? I’d love to hear them!

A lot of raw food recipes call for soaked nuts or seeds. Sometimes the reason for soaking is for flavor or texture and sometimes it’s for increased nutritional value.  Many nuts, especially almonds and walnuts, taste better once soaked and rinsed. They lose that astringent taste because the tannins are rinsed away, leaving behind a softer, more buttery nut. The soak water from nuts and seeds should never be used in a recipe.

When soaked long enough, nuts and seeds can begin the sprouting process which makes them more nutritious. Other benefits to soaking include increased enzyme activity, greater absorption of the food’s nutrients by the body and increased digestibility.

Nuts without skins such as cashews, macadamias or Brazil nuts don’t leave behind as much of the residue, but soaking is still recommended for blending and for nutritional purposes.

Some reasons for soaking:

  1. To remove or reduce phytic acid.
  2. To remove or reduce tannins.
  3. To neutralize the enzyme inhibitors.
  4. To encourage the production of beneficial enzymes.
  5. To increase the amounts of vitamins, especially B vitamins.
  6. To break down gluten and make digestion easier.
  7. To make the proteins more readily available for absorption.

Soaking and Sprouting Chart:

Nut / Seed Dry Amount Soak Time Sprout Time Sprout Length Yield
Alfalfa Seed 3 Tbsp 12 Hours 3-5 Days 1-2 Inches 4 Cups
almonds 3 Cups 8-12 Hours 1-3 Days 1/8 Inch 4 Cups
Amaranth 1 Cup 3-5 Hours 2-3 Days 1/4 Inch 3 Cups
Barley, Hulless 1 Cup 6 Hours 12-24 Hours 1/4 Inch 2 Cups
Broccoli Seed 2 Tbsp 8 Hours 3-4 Days 1-2 Inches 2 Cups
Buckwheat, Hulled 1 Cup 6 Hours 1-2 Days 1/8-1/2 Inch 2 Cups
Cabbage Seed 1 Tbsp 4-6 Hours 4-5 Days 1-2 Inches 1 1/2 Cups
Cashews 3 Cups 2-3 Hours     4 Cups
Fenugreek 4 Tbsp 6 Hours 2-5 Days 1-2 Inches 3 Cups
Flax Seeds 1 Cup 6 Hours     2 Cups
Garbanzo Beans(Chick Pea) 1 Cup 12-48 Hours 2-4 Days 1/2-1 Inch 4 Cups
Kale Seed 4 Tbsp 4-6 Hours 4-6 Days 3/4-1 Inch 3-4 Cups
Lentil 3/4 Cup 8 Hours 2-3 Days 1/2-1 Inch 4 Cups
Millet 1 Cup 5 Hours 12 Hours 1/16 Inch 3 Cups
Mung Beans 1/3 Cup 8 Hours 4-5 Days 1/4-3 Inches 4 Cups
Oats, Hulled 1 Cup 8 Hours 1-2 Days 1/8 Inch 1 Cup
Pea 1 Cup 8 Hours 2-3 Days 1/2-1 Inch 3 Cups
Pinto Bean 1 Cup 12 Hours 3-4 Days 1/2-1 Inch 3-4 Cups
Pumpkin 1 Cup 6 Hours 1-2 Days 1/8 Inch 2 Cups
Quinoa 1 Cup 3-4 Hours 2-3 Days 1/2 Inch 3 Cups
Radish 3 Tbsp 6 Hours 3-5 Days 3/4-2 Inches 4 Cups
Rye 1 Cup 6-8 Hours 2-3 Days 1/2-3/4 Inch 3 Cups
Sesame Seed,Hulled 1 Cup 8 Hours     1 1/2 Cups
Spelt 1 Cup 6 Hours 1-2 Days 1/4 Inch 3 Cups
Sunflower, Hulled 1 Cup 6-8 Hours 1 Day 1/4-1/2 Inch 2 Cups
almonds and walnuts 3 Cups 4 Hours     4 Cups
Wheat 1 Cup 8-10 Hours 2-3 Days 1/4-3/4 Inch 3 Cups
Wild Rice 1 Cup 12 Hours 2-3 Days Rice Splits 3 Cups

Here’s a printable chart…

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*